Two Clean Meat Companies Lead the Way on Social Media

A while back we took a look with Underhood how insect companies are doing online on different social media platforms and the results were mostly appalling. The statistics show most companies are lazy to reach out to their audiences. You can find the article here. Underhood (underhood.co) is a Finnish startup that is measuring social performance of thousands of brands. Currently, there are about ten thousand companies, organizations or other brands analyzed daily on the service.

Another emerging new food business is Clean Meat, meat produced in bioreactors without the need of rearing and slaughtering of animals.  Clean meat- industry has a lot in common with insect-for-and-feed business: Both are high protein food sources that are offering a more sustainable alternative for traditional animal agriculture. Moreover, both are unknown to the wide audience and are facing the challenge of how to convince people of the safety and benefits their products offer.

Here below are 10 clean meat companies ranked by Underhood. Brands are analyzed by their social performance (language analysis, engagement numbers, and visibility) and given a social score. The scale is from 1 to 10 and you can click on any brand to see the full social analysis. The score is updated daily, the data shown below is from 11th of November 2018.

top 10 clean meat

Underhood’s ranking as in 11th of November 2018

The two largest companies in the field are also the best-performing companies in social media. Scoring above six tells of a good social media strategy that is being executed consistently. Just is updating their social media channels almost daily and they have a good number of likes on Facebook; over 300.000. Looking at Just’s numbers it can be seen that Just is very consistent how to they are communicating, but what doesn’t work so well is that people are not reacting to the posts.

just

What is an interesting difference between Just and Memphis Meats is that Just is succeeding nicely in Facebook, while Memphis’s most successful posts are on Twitter. Twitter is nice and good to have, but Facebook is clearly the most important platform that should be priority number one.

Looking closer to New Age Meats- company interesting things can be found that others could learn from. From the top ten posts that have collected most likes, shares, and comments nine were done by New Age Meats.

new age

Top 4 posts in the past 30 days from the 10 listed companies as in 11th of November 2018. All four were posted by New Age Meats.

Where New Age Meats is not performing well is how they are responding to comments:

new score

At the other end of the scale, things look pretty abysmal and it is obvious that social media is not considered important at all. Aleph farms- company doesn’t even have Facebook or Twitter- page.

As we see it, it is crucial that brands of this new industry get active on social. There are a couple of companies doing it well, but the majority are not doing their part. There is no way we can convince people to take on new food habits if we do not spread the word in the most personal media, meaning Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other platforms. It seems the industry players are not taking full advantage of the excellent and cost-effective opportunity to market their new and exciting products. The revolution needs to have evangelists!

 

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Impossible Foods Must Ask Harder Scientific Questions

Techcrunch posted a very interesting interview on 22nd of May 2017, titled “Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown says VCs need to ask harder scientific questions”. After reading the article, I had to check that I wasn’t reading The Onion.

In the interview, Pat Brown attacks the clean meat industry and VCs with claims that were all proven untrue in a great reply by VC Seth Bannon. The aggressive tone of the interview did not bother me as much as the lack of knowledge shown by Mr Brown. Yes, answering the question “Why not try clean meat?” by saying “The simple answer is because that is one of the stupidest ideas ever expressed” already makes you sound like Donald Trump, but when you back up your claim with untrue statements, things start to look very bad.

Mr Bannon did good job at answering the false claims, but I will continue by looking at two additional points of the interview.

Mr Brown said that with clean meat technology, “you buy into, at best, the same limitations that a cow has.” This statement is very interesting when looking at Impossible Foods’ product. The company is trying to mimic meat as much as possible using plant based raw materials. Isn’t this approach buying into the limitations of the cow? It’s possible the company is looking to go beyond meat at some point, but to an outsider it seems that the product development’s main goal is not to make the best tasting or the best nutritional value having product, but a product that looks, tastes and feels like cow. Yes, the way Impossible Foods are aiming to do it is more efficient and ecological cow rearing, but they share the same goal with the clean meat companies.

The second thing that especially struck my eye was Mr Brown’s demand that VCs should ask harder scientific questions to understand e.g. that clean meat “is one of the stupidest ideas ever expressed”. While demanding deeper studying and understanding from VCs, Mr Brown himself obviously has limited understanding of substitute technologies that his own company is using.

I think the founder has more tendency to have skewed view on his or her business than the outsider. Maybe it is actually Impossible Foods and Mr Brown who need to ask the harder scientific questions?

ps. While you are here you might want to read my related post 5 Questions an Investor Should Ask Before Investing into a Insect Farm from June 2015.